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Schooled Reprint Edition
Contributor(s): Korman, Gordon
ISBN: 1423105168     ISBN-13: 9781423105169
Publisher: Disney Pr
    OUR PRICE: $6.30  
Product Type: Paperback - Other Formats
Published: August 2008
Qty:
Annotation: Capricorn "Cap" Anderson has never watched television. He's never tasted a pizza. Never even heard of a wedgie. Since he was little, his only experience has been living on a farm commune and being home schooled by his hippie grandmother, Rain. But when Rain falls out of a tree while picking plums, and has to stay in the hospital, Cap is forced to move in with a guidance counselor and her cranky teen daughter and attend the local middle school. While Cap knows a lot about tie-dyeing and Zen Buddhism, no education could prepare him for the politics of public school.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Home schooling; Fiction.
Schools; Fiction.
Bullies; Fiction.
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | School & Education
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: bl2008027635
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 3-4, Age 8-9
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 8.00" H x 5.50" W x 0.50" (0.50 lbs) 208 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 116008
Reading Level: 4.9   Interest Level: Middle Grades   Point Value: 6.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q41966
Reading Level: 4.7   Interest Level: Grades 6-8   Point Value: 11.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2007 August)

Gr 6–9— Capricorn, 13, lives with his hippie grandmother on a farm commune. He's never been to school, never watched TV, and doesn't even own a phone. When Rain falls out of a tree while picking plums and is sent to rehab for several weeks, Cap stays with a social worker and is sent to the local junior high school. There he is introduced to iPods, cell phones, spit balls, and harassment. Cap, with his long frizzy hair, hemp shoes, and serene ignorance of everything most of the kids care about, is the dweebiest of the dweebs, and it's the custom at this school to elect such a kid to be eighth-grade class president (which offers extra humiliation opportunities). The story is told from multiple points of view, adding depth to even the most unsympathetic characters. Korman's humor is a mix of edgy and silly, the plot moves along at a steady pace, and the accessible and smooth writing style brings all the elements together to make a satisfying whole. The plot is not long on plausibility, but maybe that's not important in this case. Will Cap's ingrained peacefulness and sense of self win out in the end? Will it matter that he's entrusted with writing checks to help pay for the eighth-grade dance, even though he's not clear on the concept of what a check is? Readers will stay tuned to the last page, and Korman's many fans won't be disappointed.—Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL

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