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Absolutely Almost
ISBN: 9780147508577
Author: Graff, Lisa
Publisher: Puffin
Published: May 2015
Retail: $8.99    OUR PRICE: $1.99
     You Save 78%
Binding Type: Paperback
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Annotation: Ten-year-old Albie has never been the smartest, tallest, most athletic, greatest artist, or most musical in his class, as his parents keep reminding him, but new nanny Calista helps him uncover his strengths and take pride in himself. Simultaneous eBook.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | Social Issues | Friendship
- Juvenile Fiction | Social Issues | Self-esteem & Self-reliance
Library of Congress Subjects:
Self-esteem; Fiction.
Ability; Fiction.
Babysitters; Fiction.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: bl2015014954
Lexile Measure: 750
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 4-6, Age 9-11
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Target Grade: 4-6
Grade level: 4-6
Physical Information: 1.00" H x 100.00" L x 5.50" W
Bargain Category: Growing Up, Middle School, Upper Elementary
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): Lisa Graff is the National Book Award nominated author of A Tangle of Knots, Double Dog Dare, Umbrella Summer, The Life and Crimes of Bernetta Wallflower,The Thing About Georgieand Sophie Simon Solves Them All. Originally from California, she lived for many years in New York City and now makes her home just outside of Philadelphia. You can visit her online at www.lisagraff.com or follow her on Twitter @lisagraff.Lisa Graff is the National Book Award nominated author of A Tangle of Knots, Double Dog Dare, Umbrella Summer, The Life and Crimes of Bernetta Wallflower,The Thing About Georgie and Sophie Simon Solves Them All. Originally from California, she lived for many years in New York City and now makes her home just outside of Philadelphia. You can visit her online at www.lisagraff.com or follow her on Twitter @lisagraff.
Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2014 Fall)
Ten-year-old New Yorker Albie is a middle-of-the-road (at best) student. He's buoyed by small successes in math club and on spelling tests, and by his new babysitter's low-key approach to confidence-boosting. Albie is a sweet, vulnerable kid who just needs a little extra help and to whom readers may well relate. Short chapters add to the story's accessibility and keep the pace moving.
Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2014 #3)
Ten-year-old New Yorker Albie is starting at P.S. 183, having been kicked out of his fancy prep school because of low grades. Albie tries hard, but he's a middle-of-the-road (at best) student, an "almost," as he calls it. At his new school, he starts a tentative friendship with fellow outcast Betsy, who has a stutter, and he's buoyed by small successes in math club and on spelling tests. Most importantly, though, his new babysitter, Calista, is a sympathetic adult. Her low-key approach to confidence-boosting includes teaching him to draw superheroes and taking him to the zoo for a "sad day" after a particularly challenging day of school -- which, unfortunately, leads to her dismissal. Like Kevin Henkes's Billy Miller (The Year of Billy Miller, rev. 9/13), Albie is a sweet, vulnerable kid who just needs a little extra help and to whom readers may well relate. Short chapters -- some just one page -- add to the story's accessibility and keep the pace moving. The characters are well rounded, and, gratifyingly, even Albie's seemingly single-minded, results-driven parents come through for him in the end. elissa gershowit Copyright 2014 Horn Book Magazine.
Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2014 April #3)

Half-Korean 10-year-old Albie is being forced to switch from his private New York City school to P.S. 183. His new school gives him more specialized attention, but it also means dodging a name-calling bully and making friends other than his buddy Erlan, whose family is starring in a reality TV show. Because of Albie's academic struggles (especially in spelling and math), his mother hires Calista, a college art student, to tutor and spend time with him. Albie isn't happy about these and other developments, and his matter-of-fact observations are often both humorous and poignant: "I didn't think the book was for babies at all, because for one thing babies can't read," he thinks after his mother tells him he's "way too old" for Captain Underpants and hands him a copy of Johnny Tremain. Graff's (A Tangle of Knots) gentle story invokes evergreen themes of coming to appreciate one's strengths (and weaknesses), and stands out for its thoughtful, moving portrait of a boy who learns to keep moving forward, taking on the world at his own speed. Ages 8–12. Agent: Stephen Barbara, Foundry Literary + Media. (June)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2014 May)

Gr 4–6—Albie, an only child living in New York City, has learning difficulties. No matter how hard he tries to give the correct change to the takeout delivery guy, or get all his spelling words correct, he inevitably fails to get it right. When readers meet the fifth-grader, he's just left his fancy private school and is about to be the new kid at public school. His dad is mostly absent and forgetful, except when demanding that Albie try harder. His mom tells him that Dav Pilkey's "Captain Underpants" (Scholastic) is for babies, and gives him Esther Forbes's Johnny Tremain instead. His exacting Korean grandfather predicts that he will end up in a ditch. At school, despite some sympathetic teachers, he is bullied and teased. His only friend is Betsy, reserved and bullied herself. Things begin to change when Albie gets a new babysitter. Calista is an artist and definitely unusual: she makes a cover for Albie's Captain Underpants that says "Johnny Tremain." She takes him for donuts and to art exhibits and, most importantly, she likes him for who he is. Albie's just-believable naiveté leads him into social difficulties as he is given an opportunity to be one of the "cool" kids, even though this entails abandoning his friendship with Betsy. Despite the fact that Graff is scrupulously honest in refusing to provide a conveniently happy ending, Albie comes through significant emotional hardship to a genuine sense of self-worth. Albie himself would find this book inviting at first glance: short chapters, an accessible sans serif font, and plenty of white space, and even his mom might think it acceptable for a fifth grader.—Sue Giffard, Ethical Culture Fieldston School, New York City

[Page 109]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.