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Green Angel
ISBN: 9780545204118
Author: Hoffman, Alice
Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
Published: February 2010
Retail: $5.99    OUR PRICE: $2.99
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Binding Type: Hardcover
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Annotation: Left on her own when her family dies in a terrible disaster, fifteen-year-old Green is haunted by loss and by the past. Struggling to survive physically and emotionally in a place where nothing seems to grow and ashes are everywhere, Green retreats into the ruined realm of her garden. But in destroying her feelings, she also begins to destroy herself, erasing the girl she'd once been as she inks darkness into her skin. It is only through a series of mysterious encounters that Green can relearn the lessons of love and begin to heal enough to tell her story.

Additional Information
Target Grade: 7-9
Grade level: 7-9
Physical Information: 0.50" H x 50.00" L x 4.50" W
Bargain Category: Growing Up, High School, Middle School, Reference, Social Issues
Grade level(s): 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2003 Fall)
From her idyllic village home, Green watches as the city across the river is suddenly blown to bits--the city where her family has gone to sell vegetables. Sewing thorns to her clothes and nails to her boots, Green tries to create a shield against grief, against all feeling. Her journey, we know, will be to rediscover the life inside her armor. Hoffman's fairy-tale prose lends moments of lyricism to Green's sympathetic story of rebirth. Copyright 2003 Horn Book Guide Reviews
Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2003 #2)
The subject of HoffmanÆs second fairy-tale novel for children is considerably darker than that of the first, the light mermaid fantasy Aquamarine, but it does fill the pages of a novel more successfully. From her idyllic village home, Green watches as the city across the river is suddenly blown to bitsùthe city where her beloved family has gone to sell the vegetables they grow. As ash and embers fly across the river, nearly blinding Green and covering everything in soot, she begins her transformation. Sewing thorns to her clothes and nails to her boots, Green tries to create a shield against grief, against all feeling. She covers her body in black tattoos and takes the name Ash. Her journey, we know, will be to rediscover the life (or Green) inside her armor. The tragic events are softened by the distance and magic of once-upon-a-time. A weak girl whom Ash cannot save seems to have ôdrifted into the fire [and] turned into smoke.ö A badly burned boy appears at AshÆs door like the wounded animals before him; as he regenerates her forsaken garden, her black tattoos become greenùand so, of course, does she. Though Hoffman has not yet brought the playful magic of her adult writing to her work for younger readers, her fairy-tale prose lends moments of lyricism to GreenÆs sympathetic story of rebirth. Copyright 2003 Horn Book Magazine Reviews
Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2003 January #1)
In lean, hypnotic prose, Hoffman (Indigo) constructs a post-apocalyptic fairy tale leavened with hope. "I was a moody, dark weed," confides Green, a shy 15-year-old with a talent for gardening who narrates the novel. Angry at being left behind one day when her parents and younger sister go to the city to sell the family's produce, Green has "too much pride to say good-bye." She comes to regret her decision when a cataclysmic fire destroys the city-and her family. In an all-too-frighteningly familiar scene, Hoffman describes bystanders who "could see people jumping from the buildings, like silver birds, like bright diamonds." Green walls herself off from emotion. She renames herself Ash, crafts a sort of armor from her father's old leather jacket and nail-studded boots, sews thorns onto her clothes and tattoos her body. "Blood and ink. Darkness where before there had been patience, black where there'd once been green." But she begins to heal all the same: she leaves food for a desperate classmate for whom she had once felt only envy, and takes in a stray dog, a wounded hawk and a mysterious boy her age who keeps his face covered and does not speak. The author builds the narrative like a poem, meticulously choosing metaphors that reverberate throughout the novel. The "diamonds," the lives lost, become reborn in the person of the mute boy whom Green calls Diamond; sparrows knit Green a fishing net from her own hair, with which to catch supper when her food runs out. The birth of spring coincides with the rebuilding of the city-and Green's reawakening ("I could feel something green growing inside me. Green as summer in my bones"). In lesser hands, the layers of dense, lush description-apple trees "as fruitless as fence posts"; "mourning doves the color of tears"-might have overwhelmed the dreamy, first-person narrative. But Hoffman creates a careful balance, crafting an achingly lovely backdrop to the transfiguration of a compelling character whose very self becomes a metaphor for renewal. Ages 12-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2004 June #3)
A shy 15-year-old girl is left behind one day when her family goes into the city and perishes in a cataclysmic fire. In a boxed review, PW described the novel as "a post-apocalyptic fairy tale leavened with hope." Ages 11-up. (June) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2003 March)
Gr 8 Up-Beautifully written prose fills this first-person narrative of a teen whose world is turned around in an instant. This is both a survival story and an homage to the need to cherish life's every moment. Moody, introspective Green, 15, stays at home while her parents and younger sister travel to the city to sell their produce. Her disappointment at being left behind causes her to be cold and not say good-bye. Then the city is engulfed in flames, and ashes hover in the atmosphere for a long time. Green is left with her guilt for her sullen behavior and the solitude of her ruined garden. Hoffman has created a multilayered, believable protagonist. Readers suffer along with her and share her fears as she tries to pick up the pieces of her life. The contrast between her original faith in the promise of the future and her later acknowledgment of the tentative nature of reality is vividly and eloquently portrayed. This is not an easy read, and though it is an absorbing tale, it will most likely appeal to more sophisticated readers. A powerfully written and thought-provoking selection.-Renee Steinberg, Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2004 October)
Gr 8 Up-When her world disappears in a maelstrom of fire and ash, 15-year-old Green struggles to survive. Through her encounters with others she slowly begins to heal and create a new life. A beautifully written, allegorical story. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.