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Abraham Lincoln: Letters from Slave Girl
ISBN: 9781890817602
Author: Pinkney, Andrea Davis
Publisher: Winslowhouse International
Published: May 2001
Retail: $8.95    OUR PRICE: $2.99
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Binding Type: Hardcover
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Annotation: The Dear Mr. President series brings history alive through fictitious correspondence between a president and a young person. These thought-provoking letters provide valuable insights into important moments in American history through their portrayal of issues from other times. Although the letters are imagined, they are all based upon meticulous historical research. To capture each president's personality and the voice of the youth of each time period, the authors draw on definitive books, firsthand interviews, and other reliable sources.

Elegantly designed in two colors, the books include photographs, illustrations, maps, primary source material, reproductions of actual letters, a presidential biography, U.S. postal history, timelines, and an index.

The interactive Web footnotes throughout the books are a unique feature of the Dear Mr. President series. These footnotes point readers to the series Web page at winslowpress.com for further information on a particular topic. This invaluable Web page encourages individual exploration, expertly guiding visitors through the vast resources of the Internet. There they will find primary source materials, links, historical sites, interactive games, and activities.

Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Nonfiction | Biography & Autobiography | Historical
Library of Congress Subjects:
Emancipation Proclamation; Fiction.
Slavery; Fiction.
Letters; Fiction.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: 00043846
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 4-6, Age 9-11
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 0.59" H x 8.78" L x 6.36" W 136 pages
Bargain Category: Upper Elementary, Middle School, Historical Fiction
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
The Dear Mr. President series brings history alive through fictitious correspondence between a president and a young person. These thought-provoking letters provide valuable insights into important moments in American history through their portrayal of issues from other times. Although the letters are imagined, they are all based upon meticulous historical research. To capture each president's personality and the voice of the youth of each time period, the authors draw on definitive books, firsthand interviews, and other reliable sources.

Elegantly designed in two colors, the books include photographs, illustrations, maps, primary source material, reproductions of actual letters, a presidential biography, U.S. postal history, timelines, and an index.

The interactive Web footnotes throughout the books are a unique feature of the Dear Mr. President series. These footnotes point readers to the series Web page at winslowpress.com for further information on a particular topic. This invaluable Web page encourages individual exploration, expertly guiding visitors through the vast resources of the Internet. There they will find primary source materials, links, historical sites, interactive games, and activities.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2002 Spring)
Abraham Lincoln and a fictional slave girl, Lettie Tucker, share stories and inspiration while exchanging letters during the Civil War. ItÆs difficult to get past the contrivance of their intimate friendship, and footnotes suggesting readers ""find out more"" by accessing the publisherÆs website are distracting. Biographical information on Lincoln follows the exchange. Ind. Copyright 2002 Horn Book Guide Reviews
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2001 September)
Gr 5-7-This series title presents fictionalized letters between a 12-year-old slave girl living on a South Carolina plantation and President Lincoln, from 1861 to 1863. Lettie Tucker has been secretly taught to read and write by the plantation owner's daughter, who encouraged her to begin the correspondence. She describes her life and her family's circumstances and challenges the president on his position toward slavery, urging him to free the slaves. Lincoln describes his life with the First Lady and two of their sons in the White House, the progress of the war, and his evolving position regarding slavery, culminating in the Emancipation Proclamation. The book includes photos, paintings, engravings, prints, reproductions, and a description of the U.S. postal service. This title raises interesting issues about slavery that are relevant to present-day discussions on race relations. It will be useful for supplementary reading for school curricula.-Marilyn Ackerman, Brooklyn Public Library, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.